Wireless Power Transmission, Part III

Today’s going to be a great day. We’re making progress on the project.1 Our plan:

  1. Print prior art and put in a binder
  2. Review prior art
  3. Decide on prototype
  4. Buy materials for prototype
  5. Build prototype
  6. Smoke test prototype
  7. Experiment with prototype

Print prior art and put in a binder

We printed all the material we found and posted here and here, three-hole-punched it and put it in a binder. Thanks to FinePrint,2 we didn’t use as much paper as we might otherwise have.

Review prior art

So much for this being a quick process. Instead, we just found a bunch more to review, this time at YouTube.

Also interesting is MIT’s “Goodbye wires!” which links to a PDF of their paper, “Efficient wireless non-radiative mid-range energy transfer.”

Decide on prototype

It’s hard to beat cheap, so we’re going to attempt the Wireless Electricity (for under $20) project, though that cost estimate seems to assume already having a stocked experimenter’s lab. This is sending us down the bifilar winding rat hole and into Tesla territory. A lot of strange stuff (and denizens) there.

Buy materials for prototype

That starts tomorrow.

But wait — there’s more

See all posts on Jamison’s Wireless Power Transmission project.


  1. Jamison’s project is based on the Instructable, “Low-Power Wireless Charging.” â†©
  2. And Art. :-) â†©

Wireless Power Transmission, Part II

Jamison and I are continuing with phase II of his Wireless Power Transmission project:1Jamison’s project is based on the Instructable, “Low-Power Wireless Charging. Research how others have solved the problem.

Instructables continues to be a great resource. At least, we hope so. We haven’t tried building anything quite yet. That will change soon. Here’s a few more links:

It’s almost time to move to the next phase.

But wait — there’s more

See all posts on Jamison’s Wireless Power Transmission project.

Wireless Power Transmission, Part I

Jamison and I are starting an engineering project1Jamison’s project is based on the Instructable, “Low-Power Wireless Charging. for his school’s science and engineering fair. This is the second year his school’s fair accepts engineering projects. Instead of doing a science experiment using the scientific method, we get to engineer:

  • Identify a problem
  • Research how others have solved it
  • Develop our own solution
  • Refine our solution

We want to transfer electrical power over a short distance without a direct, hard-wired connection. Here’s where we’re starting our research:

This should be fun. :-)

But wait — there’s more

See all posts on Jamison’s Wireless Power Transmission project.