Guy Kawasaki’s Advice: Live With Mom and Dad

Ashley and Heather informed us they are planning to live at home after college to pay off student loans and save some money. It brought to mind Guy Kawasaki’s famous commencement speech:

#10: Live off your parents as long as possible.

I was a diligent Oriental in high school and college. I took college-level classes and earned college-level credits. I rushed through college in 3 1/2 years. I never traveled or took time off because I thought it wouldn’t prepare me for work and it would delay my graduation.

Frankly, I blew it.

You are going to work the rest of your lives, so don’t be in a rush to start. Stretch out your college education. Now is the time to suck life into your lungs-before you have a mortgage, kids, and car payments.

Take whole semesters off to travel overseas. Take jobs and internships that pay less money or no money. Investigate your passions on your parent’s nickel. Or dime. Or quarter. Or dollar. Your goal should be to extend college to at least six years.

Delay, as long as possible, the inevitable entry into the workplace and a lifetime of servitude to bozos who know less than you do, but who make more money. Your parents and grand parents worked very hard to get you and your family to this point. Do not deprive them of the pleasure of supporting you.

Living with parents is only part of Guy’s advice, and it isn’t the only part our kids are doing right.

Go read items #9 through #1. Good advice all the way through.

And kids, we’ll keep your rooms available.

10/20/30

I’m giving a presentation in a couple of days. As typical, I’m using PowerPoint. (Can you give a presentation without using PowerPoint?)

I have a lot of experience with PowerPoint, from both sides of the projector. Some foils are interesting; others are eye charts.

Guy Kawasaki has a 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint:

  • No more than 10 slides
  • No more than 20 minutes
  • No font smaller than 30 points

I like it! I even created my slides using these rules. Unfortunately, the person managing the presentation didn’t see the wisdom of nine slides having only a word or two each. I guess it makes sense; I think the slides will be given as handouts afterwards.

Which makes me ask: why not use different slides for the presentation and handouts?

For an example of using more than ten slides, watch Dick “master of the clicker” Hardt at OSCON 2005.