Longboarding the Banks-Vernonia Trail

Jamison wanted to longboard the Banks-Vernonia State Trail and Suzi and Melissa were willing to shuttle us so we wouldn’t have to do the 3-trip car-shuttle thingie. I couldn’t say no. ;-)

Jamison posted on Instagram. (More below…)

Suzi and Melissa walked the pups while they waited for us. We ended up skating Tophill to Buxton twice. In between runs, we walked the Buxton Trestle, Melissa walked the dog through the creek, and we found some blackberries. Mmm… :-)

What a great day!

Hillsboro Fourth Of July Parade 2019

I love me a good parade and Hillsboro has a great one!

It’s my one day of the year I feel comfortable taking strangers’ pictures. After all, they literally paid to be in public, wearing what they’re wearing, doing what they’re doing. And most don’t seem to mind. Hopefully none of those I posted. I’m not going to post a picture of someone that puts them in an unflattering light. Many of these shots are of people who saw what I was doing and waved and/or smiled in response. One actually told me to take her picture (and then it didn’t turn out well, so I didn’t post it).

I know some of these are not as sharp as they could be. If this was my full-time gig, I’d certainly have a different camera. Or, I’d actually have a camera rather than borrowing.1 This exercise certainly informs what camera would be a better fit for me.

Once again, I got to shake Ron Wyden’s hand. Turns out, he’s in one of the pictures, too.

I have some recommendations for you:

  1. Go to Hillsboro’s Fourth of July parade. It’s just a bunch of fun.
  2. Take a camera with a longish lens. The camera I was using is an APS-C with an 18-135mm. I found myself using both extremes of the range, though it’s telling that I didn’t end up posting anything at the short/wide end. Maybe a 70-210 on a full frame camera would work.
  3. Sit on the curb. The kids know where it’s at. You’ll get a better, unobstructed view – and more candy!
  4. Find a place closer to the beginning of the parade. You’ll get more candy and those in the parade are still full of energy and having fun. We find a spot on Second, between Grant and Bagley Park.

I hope you had a great Fourth!


  1. Thanks, Ashley! You know how much being able to borrow your camera made this day for me. :-) 

Sunday in and around Hood River

Suzi and I took a quick trip to Hood River. As we neared, we discovered our main reason for going wasn’t going to happen. It was time to improvise.

We found a cool, little taqueria for lunch and then drove to Parkdale. On the way back to Hood River, we saw a sign for Lavender Valley. What could that be? Sure enough, a lavender farm. Fun!

After returning to Hood River, we watch the kite sailers zip around on their hydrofoil-borne craft. It’s wild! Certainly nothing like the Hobie 14 I used to sail. These things are faster and are likely transportable in commercial air travel.

Another good day!

The Washington Post recommends books for every age

Books for the ages. “Here are our picks for worthwhile books to read during each year of life, from 1 to 100, along with some of the age-appropriate wisdom they impart.”

Looks like a good list. I’ve read only nine of them … so far.

How many have you read? Any favorites you’d recommend or others you’d add for a specific stage of life?

Naming a 1:1 meeting

Suppose you’re Mike setting up a 1:1 meeting with Julie. What should you name the calendar meeting request?

  • Julie / Mike
  • Mike / Julie
  • Julie

If you’re like me, you probably choose the first option. You’re meeting with Julie, so her name goes first. It would feel egotistical to put your own name first, right? Besides, this is what Google’s newish scheduling feature does. (Video)

But what’s most useful for Julie? When she looks at her calendar, she’ll want to know who she’s meeting with, not her own name. She already knows that. So put your own name first. Then, even on a small phone screen, she’ll see it.

Yeah, it will be a little harder for you. But you’re the one setting up the meeting. Be kind.

Btw, if you include only her name (the third option), she’ll have to open the appointment on her calendar to see who sent it.1


  1. Don’t laugh. I have meetings like that on my calendar. This post is apparently my passive aggressive response… ;-) 

#ShowYourStripes

#ShowYourStripes. “These ‘warming stripe’ graphics are visual representations of the change in temperature as measured in each country over the past 100+ years. Each stripe represents the temperature in that country averaged over a year. For most countries, the stripes start in the year 1901 and finish in 2018. For the UK, USA, Switzerland & Germany, the data starts in the late 19th century. […] For each country, the average temperature in 1971-2000 is set as the boundary between blue and red colours, and the colour scale varies from +/- 2.6 standard deviations of the annual average temperatures between 1901-2000.”

It’s interesting to see how the average temperature for the globe is much more dramatic than any of the smaller areas I chose.